New Pattern! It’s blue! It’s bigger on the inside! It’s a TARDIS!

Ever since I made the Dalek pattern (Who’s the Bad Guy?) people have been asking “Where’s the TARDIS?” Well, ask no more!

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This is one of the new patterns I introduced for Quilt Market last week! (psst… there are others… watch this space)

It’s 50” x 80”, the same size as the Dalek, and big enough to snuggle or top a twin bed. The skill level is easy too – it’s all straight lines, with a few snowballed triangles and no applique unless you feel the need to just do some because you think it’s fun (and I do believe they have meds for that if it’s becoming a problem for you…)

I designed a companion Spoonflower fat quarter for all of the text parts, and I’m tickled with how that came out. If you don’t want to Spoonflower, there are full sized patterns for tracing out the wordy bits and doing them any way that takes your fancy. The pattern also offers color codes for three different colorways of Kaufman fabrics – one done in the Quilter’s Linen, and two in Kona solids – one bright, and one a bit darker and moodier.*

I really had a blast with this one… my son helped with the design, and stunt-sewists (and rabid Who fans) Flaun and Kimberly hammered the pattern into shape for you.

PDF copies are available now here, and hard copies here (but FYI those aren’t shipping until June 4th).

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* Disclosure: The kind people at Robert Kaufman Fabrics supplied the fabric for the cover quilt.

 

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New Sassy Buttons!

The last minute prep for Spring Quilt Market is under way… the suitcases are out, the new pattern samples are with the distributors (I’ll give you a peek next week), and I have one load of laundry left to go.

One of the things I always take to market are Sassy Buttons… usually a bag of the latest and favorites, along with a bag of brand new ones, hot off the presses, to share and test. But it hardly seems fair to exclude you, dear readers, from the newest sass! So here they are:

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If you’re interested in winning a set, leave a comment telling me which one you would give to a specific friend and why – I’ll draw after I get back from Market next week. YES, if you’re outside of the USA, you can play too :-)

As for Market – keep an eye on Facebook and Instagram ( @ huntersds ) – I’ll be posting pix there for you too. If there’s something specific you want me to look for, please mention it on FB and I’ll do what I can to track down a picture for you.

BTW – Did you join my mailing list yet? Do it here. I’m dreaming up groovy exclusive stuff for you!

 

 

Finishing Birch Bark

The games continued yesterday, and as promised, here are more detailed shots and more process information as I finished the Birch Bark quilt for Hoffman Fabrics. As always – if you have any questions, leave them in the comments and I’ll answer as best I can!

The first job of the day was to make the backing. I had yardage for this, so no pieced backing needed. One seam did the trick. BTW, if you don’t have the Creative Grids yardstick ruler, you NEED one. I can’t believe how much I use it.

IMG_4967It’s still important to take off the selvedges on the seams for a back. You’ll notice that they are often tighter than the rest of the fabric, so if still in the seam they can lead to puckers on the back. Also, and again especially with batiks with their denser weave, the thicker edge can make you break a needle. I used a 1/4 inch seam and pressed it to one side. Had I been sending it to a long arm artist, I would have used a 1/2 inch seam for extra insurance, and pressed it open to reduce density (or asked for the artist’s preferences).

I use spray baste, specifically 505. I think it is the least smelly of the bunch, and holds well for a long time (seriously, I’ve had stuff spray basted in the bottom of the closet for a couple of years and didn’t need to re-do it when the time came to quilt it). When I started using spray, I didn’t get shown how by the people that “knew” so I daresay my method could be considered wrong. But it works well for me with the studio tools I have available so let me see if I can explain it well in pix (one of these days I swear I will attempt video).

First I clip the back down to my table. It’s one of those old, heavy, particle board affairs and it’s perfect for the job. Just like when you pin baste, it’s important to have a smooth tension on it, but don’t stretch the back or you WILL get wrinkles. I work from top to bottom on the quilt, not from the center. The TOP is on the left for reference.

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Then I lay the batting and top onto it. BTW – see the fan in the background – you need to have some type of fan pulling the air out of your space when you do this… I also cover all the important stuff with old sheets because it will all get sticky otherwise!

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I fold them both back, and spray the backing fabric (imagine video of me spraying here)

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Then I smooth the batting down, and spray the batting. I start at the center and move towards the edges. But don’t stretch!

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Then smooth the top down the same way.

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At this point, it’s glued from the top to the edge of the table. I unclip everything, move it towards the top so that all but about 4 inches of the the glued stuff is hanging off the top edge of the table.

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Then I re-clip the top edge (that’s glued) on the outside of the sandwich, and re-clip the backing only at the bottom edge.

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Now, we’re doing the same thing, but working from the other side of the table. Spray the backing and smooth down the batting.

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Then spray the batting, and smooth down the top. And move it again. Once you get to the bottom of the quilt, only move it as much as needed to get the bottom of the quilt onto the table. This stops you from overspraying batting and backing that might go back into your stash.

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Once all the spraying is done, unclip everything and give it a trim. I trim about an inch away.

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And done. A quick flip to the back to see if there are any wrinkles that need attending to…

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Looks good. And now onto quilting! I put this one back on the design wall to contemplate it. My first thought was to do a spiral, but that involves a lot of turning on the quilt, and remember, this one needed to get finished quickly. So I decided to go with a straight line pattern – fast and easy to do with a walking foot. This design was inspired by something my friend Flaun did recently on a commission. I set the lines on diagonal so as not to run into issues keeping them parallel to the seams in the top.

Another reason for choosing this design is that every line starts and stops OFF the edges. This also reduces the time spent pulling up threads or burying them later.

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I needed to find the right starting point for the center, and the “rule of thirds” worked well here… things that are off center in such a way that they align with thirds are usually pleasing to the eye. Here’s the third in both directions marked with a square of batting so you can see it:

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I chalked out the initial X of the design while it was on the wall so that I could see the angles.

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BTW – I used a Chaco Liner in white for this. I find the white comes off dark fabric easily, although sometimes it can be faint. I wanted a fine line to follow, and this does fine lines beautifully. I will also say that I use their other colors with reservation… sometimes they don’t come out too well. In their defense, Clover states in a blog post I dug up that they were designed for marking dress seams and darts that would be hidden, so it coming out quilts wasn’t part of the product design.

I chalked out one quadrant – one of the smaller ones to start with.

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And now to thread choices! I have a lot of Robison Anton rayon threads in my studio. I bought them before I discovered the likes of Aurifil (my #1 piecing thread) and Isacord (which I like to quilt with too), so I still use them. No sense in waste! I have quilting friends that don’t like to use rayon for “utility” quilts – those that will get used and washed a lot – as they might be too delicate and break under wear and tension. Most of my quilts are designed for photographing on pattern covers, and then carted around for trunk shows. So while I would never use nasty cheap thread, the RA is fine for how I use my quilts. I do have some utility quilts that have RA quilting that is holding up just fine – so as always – your mileage may vary!

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I ended up choosing an ORANGE. Surprise! I also want to show you these – they are Steady Betty Bands. They wrap around the palm of your hand to give you traction while quilting. I quilt with my palms, not my finger tips, so most of the gloves don’t work well for me. I also like that I can re-thread the machine or handle scissors with them on. They could be a prettier color though!

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And on to quilting! I marked one quadrant and quilted it before marking the next so as not to rub off all my chalk lines. For reference, it took 2 bobbins worth of thread to complete. The quilting unfortunately doesn’t show up well on this picture – often times the quilting on batiks gets lost in the fabric patterns.

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And onto the binding. Again, I put the quilt back on the wall while I worked out the binding choices. I had two ORANGE fabrics to work with, and liked the darker one better.

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I like to make bias binding when I can. I don’t find it any harder to cut and sew, and I like how it settles in on the edge.

How to calculate? Perimeter +20 (for goof-ups) times 2 1/2′ (width of binding), then divided by 40 (the width of the fabric), then rounded up to the next whole number, plus one (for goof-ups). In this case that was 18” x WOF. And I had about 30” left over so pretty dang perfect!

I lay it out on the mat, and make the first 45 degree cut at one corner.

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Then cut the rest of the fabric in 2 1/2” strips.

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And finally, take that first triangle that was left behind and cut it too. I leave behind the last corner triangles – usually anything under 8” (that’s why the +20 and round-up in my calculations)

Sew them end to end. Mind your right sides and wrong sides with batiks!

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Press those seams open, and the press the whole thing wrong sides together.

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And here’s the last edge getting sewn down. I join my edges with a bias seam, but that’s a game for a different post!

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Last step – I press the binding out so that when I do the hand work it folds over better.

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And DONE. This step, from making the back to ironing the binding was about 5 hours, sewing at the Speed of Sam!

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I sew the back of the binding down by hand because I like how it looks. This one took me the length of the Avengers movie on Netflix and a healthy dose of chocolate!

Total time for the entire project is right around 12 hours – but I was seriously hustling. If I was bidding it as a custom job for someone I would estimate 15 hours for safety, and surprise them with a little discount if I finished faster.

Questions? Do ask! I’m happy to help you make more quilts!

BTW – Did you join my mailing list yet? Do it here. I’m dreaming up groovy exclusive stuff for you!

 

 

Birch Bark at the “Speed of Sam”

If you follow a lot of the quilting industry people, you’ll see one of two things this week… either frantic posts about the last minute finishes we all seem to be pulling off for next week’s Spring Quilt Market in Pittsburgh – or utter silence, because of said frantic finishing! As the saying goes, if it wasn’t for the last minute, nothing would get done! And stitching binding on the plane to Market is almost a given.

I’ve sewn last minute stuff for three Markets now. I’m honored to be on call for Hoffman Fabrics… I design patterns that work well with their batiks, and so they often reach out for a booth quilt made of their newest lines. They got their new fabric in last week (no joke) and mine arrived Monday night.

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They asked for Birch Bark – one of my quick strip quilt patterns – so yesterday, I decided to photo and time myself through the top construction. I was posting on Instagram (@huntersds) and FB, but if you missed it, here are some of those shots and more, along with some of the thought process in my head. It has been a couple of years since I made one, so I estimated 5 hours for the top construction.

Hoffman sent me this new Bali Pop, which I believe will be called Sparrow. It’s all beautiful warm browns with some deep cranberry thrown in. They also sent me a couple of different ORANGE selections for the accent – they know me well! I chose the spotty one, and might use the solid for the binding (we’ll see when I get there).

Some of the new patterns in the batiks (known as “tjaps” and pronounced “chops”) are trending towards more modern and geometric patterning – and they are lovely! This group has those as well as the more organic, nature-driven patterns we’ve come to expect.

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The first step is always to take off the selvedges. Even though batiks are printed to the edge, that quarter inch of selvedge is made of thicker stuff (the warp threads are doubled at the edges). It can break your needles and distort your seams, so best be off with them!

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Next – chop up the strips and cut the accent pieces:

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To the machine! It needed a little TLC before I started. Out with the lint, in with a new needle. New needles can matter greatly with batiks as their weave is tighter. I use a Jeans/Denim 80/12 for all my piecing, and that sharp jeans tip is great for batiks.

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I chain-pieced the accents onto the strip sections…

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… and then chain-pieced those end to end to make a really, really long strip. Birch Bark is based on the Jelly Roll Race in terms of construction, so there are about 1600 inches of strip to wrangle.

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To the iron! I iron all the seams in the same direction for ease and speed.

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The strip gets turned into strata. I don’t press this until it’s all done.

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Now it can be pressed:

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The strata is cut into chunks, and the chunks go up on the design wall:

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There were a few areas where colors or accent bars came together in a way that I didn’t like.

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So I took out a seam in those blocks, and just moved one section to the other side of the piece I took it from. Even though the construction on this is partly about giving in to the randomness of how it comes together, you still get to manicure the parts that don’t make you happy!

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And seven seams later – top is DONE:

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It took 3 1/2 hours (4 from start to finish with a half hour break for lunch). Yes, I sew quite fast – my friend Melissa Z coined the phrase “Sewing at the Speed of Sam” after sitting next to me at a retreat! But I also have fast machines – both a Janome 6500 and 8900, which have delightfully fast top speeds. Still, you could still make this top in a day sewing sanely with plenty of breaks.

So today, I will be basting and quilting it. I will photograph/Instagram.FB my way through for that too, and will post it tomorrow. If you have any questions about why I do what I do the way I do it, ask on FB and I’ll try to answer those questions either as I work, or in tomorrow’s post.

BTW – Did you join my mailing list yet? Do it here. I’m dreaming up groovy exclusive stuff for you!