Come see me in Camarillo!

I’m back to the old stomping grounds this week… the Camarillo Quilters Association is hosting me for a lecture on the morning of Tuesday Jan 14 – stop by if you can and say hi! I’m also teaching Dingbats for them on Wednesday Jan 15, and I understand there might be a couple of seats left if you’re interested.

The lecture is going to include a trunk show of a lot of quilts – this is the first time I’ve done a trunk show out of a suitcase rather than a car, and I’m thrilled to find out just how much I can pack into a 50lb case. And I packed two of them!

While I was searching for the right quilts to bring, I unearthed this lovely Snail’s Trail/Virginia Reel:

Snails1It’s the only antique quilt I own. I bought it because, with all that ORANGE, I just knew it had been waiting for me to show up and love it. It’s machine pieced, but hand quilted, and still has a lot of pencil marks. It has the feel of a project that was maybe a big stretch in skill for the maker… there are a lot of points that don’t match, and there are lots of places where the orange shadows through the white at the seams because they should have been pressed the other way. The binding is a bit dodgy in places too. It is utterly charming for every spot that the imaginary quilt police might frown upon… the hand of the maker is delightfully evident everywhere! And I find myself cheering for her courage to try something that I know to be a bit tricky with all those bias-edged triangles. The last time I tried this block I paper-pieced it.

Here’s a shot of the quilting:

Snails2

 

I’m told that the style of quilting and the quality of the muslin tell that the quilt was probably made in the 1920’s. All I know is I think it’s sweet and bold, and I slept well under it last night!

 

 

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3 thoughts on “Come see me in Camarillo!

  1. I think that might be my husband’s dream quilt – lots of orange and lots of great quilting motifs. It’s fun to see the whole effect of the quilt and realize just how much all the little imperfections – unmatched seams, pencil marks etc – disappear into the overall affect.

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